Full timing in a fiver.

NeilandJo

Subscriber
We are preparing to sell up and full time in our Arctic Wolf Eurocruiser, This may all happen in the next 18 months to 2 years as my job reaches end of life, We wont have buckets of cash, so we are wondering the cost of full timing, taking in to account insurances, and vehicle running costs etc, we think it may cost as much as £8,000 a year. we like the idea of heading to Portugal or Spain for winter, but looking at pitch fees of around £20+ per night, in winter :(
Anyone else full timing in a fiver here? looking for advice / information.
 

Steve Martin

Subscriber
I am paying €200 a month with 16amp EHU showers, toilets and restaurant on site in Spain.
The most you would expect to pay in Portugal is €10 per day with EHU.
If you are going to stay the winter in EU then best advice is to join ACSI, then you will only pay the discount price of the ACSI club.
 
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NeilandJo

Subscriber
ok, thats a lot less than i thought it was going to be, have to ask, how has Brexit affected living in Spain and Portugal, I heard Portugal are happy for us to be there long term, do you have to apply for dual nationality or is this a myth?
 

chatter

Subscriber
once again on fun there are threads pertaining to extensions, i believe portugal are set up to issue once covid has retreated, the problem lies in whether the ajoining countries of france and spain will offer similar extentions to the 90day visa, as your only means of coming back here is through the ferry ports in spain or france and that would probably at the mo incur a fine for being over the 90day limit

Also might be worth you looking at 'motorhome 365' a fulltimers forum also part of jims group
 
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NeilandJo

Subscriber
Been having a read on other forums, there is some good information out there, seems to be a lot of erm freeloaders too, cant believe some of the things I'm reading :eek:
thanks for the info, time to do some more reading :)
 

Steve Martin

Subscriber
It depends on how you wish to travel, I have spent winters in Portugal and Spain both on and off campsites.
For me, being parked up on some campsites can be like living on a car park, where your neighbour can reach out his window and pass you a cup of tea and your awning almost touching the next vehicle. All very cosy but I prefer being able to see the countryside around me.
I can understand the term freeloaders as I have seen plenty of those living on car parks and beaches and leaving rubbish etc behind when they leave, but there are plenty of us who like to spend their time out in the countryside with the occasional stay near a beach.
Portugal Pego with washing out 30.11.2017.JPG
 

NeilandJo

Subscriber
The term i used was to describe those who leave their rubbish behind and defecate in the grass and woods, Having read this it kind of put me off some places, but nice to see the law is catching up with them :) It gives others a bad name, and in the end makes it illegal to park in places that make you feel free. I have also seen youtube videos of the sites you describe, knocking on your neighbours window from the comfort of your own home is very unappealing, I dread to think what would happen in the event of a fire breaking out :eek:
The search continues.
 

chatter

Subscriber
It depends on how you wish to travel, I have spent winters in Portugal and Spain both on and off campsites.
For me, being parked up on some campsites can be like living on a car park, where your neighbour can reach out his window and pass you a cup of tea and your awning almost touching the next vehicle. All very cosy but I prefer being able to see the countryside around me.
I can understand the term freeloaders as I have seen plenty of those living on car parks and beaches and leaving rubbish etc behind when they leave, but there are plenty of us who like to spend their time out in the countryside with the occasional stay near a beach.
View attachment 30224
I see you park at one end of the reservoir bridge road and the hoi-polloi park the other end
 

seaglass

Subscriber
It depends on how you wish to travel, I have spent winters in Portugal and Spain both on and off campsites.
For me, being parked up on some campsites can be like living on a car park, where your neighbour can reach out his window and pass you a cup of tea and your awning almost touching the next vehicle. All very cosy but I prefer being able to see the countryside around me.
I can understand the term freeloaders as I have seen plenty of those living on car parks and beaches and leaving rubbish etc behind when they leave, but there are plenty of us who like to spend their time out in the countryside with the occasional stay near a beach.
View attachment 30224
We once were in a campground that was so tight, when our neighbor put out their slide outs, we could not pull out our awning. Their slide-outs took half of our patio space. Last time we went there.
 
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