Electrics on campsite

SuperMike

Member
:mask: Dia I think you are running around in circles. The best thing when electrical fault finding is to be slow and methodical. Never jump a step, never do two things without checking each step as you do it. Start at the post and using someone else's lead plug them into your hook up point. If all is well, then plug them in using your lead, if it trips then the fault is in the lead. If it does not trip then the post would seem to be ok as would seem is your lead. Then use their lead to plug you into that checked post if it trips it's your RV, if it does not trip, then the RV would seem to be ok. Then try your lead again, if it trips it's your lead. Can you see where we are coming from. Be methodical write down each stage, what you did and what was the result. If you establish that the fault lies in the RV then the problem becomes difficult as the fault will be hard to find, but again, not impossible if you are methodical. Start with everything unplugged and the RV's main trip switched off, does it still blow the hook up ? If it does then the fault is between the cable connection and the RV trip and so on ......... :drunk:

Assuming it's wired correctly, you should have a single lower value trip for each main 110v appliance which should blow if a fault exists with each device, before the main RV or hook up trip pops. Note the word should. :eek:

Further, generators, do not strictly have a convensional earth, so the trip in the RV could be reacting differently when powered by this method.

Further, further, be very, very careful, electricary kills.
 
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Olley

Subscriber
Your site EHU may have an RCCD or RCBO, these depending on the type fitted, could trip as low as a 30 milliamp difference between flow and return, which might explain why your genny doesn't trip, as it could just have MCB's. In very damp weather like we are having at the moment, using an extension lead, its possible for RCCD/RCBO's to cause nuisance tripping, it doesn't take much moisture inside your plugs, to create a path for a small amount to track across the pins and they trip.

Ian
 
Have had to go on to campsite after four months. Electrical hookup fine first day then we set off the trip switches on the second day. We can run mains electric fine with on board generator and 2k generator but if anyone has any help would be great as annoying to not be benefiting from campsite electrics
Thanks for all your replies we have had some really good feed back which Dai is busy checking through. When we find the solution we will let everyone know in the mean time am running the electric from our on board Onan generator 4 k does anyone know on half load how long 5 litres or gallon of petrol will last us just so we have an ia of running costs thanks again guys
 

Daybreaker

Subscriber
gosh about a litre an hour me thinks. There was a post where members (inc. an onan specialist) posted the real amount I think he is called bungle bear (the onan man he's very nice and answers queries)
 

dippingatoe

Well-Known Member
Every RV should carry something like this:-
http://www.amazon.co.uk/SparesPlanet-Ring-Mains-Socket-Tester/dp/B00NGF4TIK/ref=sr_1_1?s=diy&ie=UTF8&qid=1420412243&sr=1-1&keywords=Ring Main Tester
for testing the site EHU post the first time you plug in. Several times I have found neutral and line reversed, so I now carry a short adapter cable carefully labeled to show that it is wired to correct reverse polarity.
Is this for when travelling abroad? Does it just plug in to the outlet?
 

Daybreaker

Subscriber
That's a martindale for 3 pin uk sockets use a multimeter that will show a negative if reversed Cheap maplins £20 will do or less even on fleabay. By the time you've plugged that in it may be too late
 

dippingatoe

Well-Known Member
I bought a multimeter on the recommendation of my brother after a couple of professional motorhome electrical engineers doing some work messed everything up to such an extent nothing worked at all. Would that do the same job?
 

paul&debra

Subscriber
Yes, put the probes in the hole right way round. If the reading is negative there is a reverse polarity. As has been said, you could make up a short extension lead (clearly marked) with the wires crossed over from one end to the other. This would then correct polarity.:D:D
 

paul&debra

Subscriber
That's a martindale for 3 pin uk sockets use a multimeter that will show a negative if reversed Cheap maplins £20 will do or less even on fleabay. By the time you've plugged that in it may be too late
You can also use that with a short lead made of a plug and socket on the other end.:D
 

Landy Lover

Subscriber
Every RV should carry something like this:-
http://www.amazon.co.uk/SparesPlanet-Ring-Mains-Socket-Tester/dp/B00NGF4TIK/ref=sr_1_1?s=diy&ie=UTF8&qid=1420412243&sr=1-1&keywords=Ring Main Tester
for testing the site EHU post the first time you plug in. Several times I have found neutral and line reversed, so I now carry a short adapter cable carefully labeled to show that it is wired to correct reverse polarity.
That's a martindale for 3 pin uk sockets use a multimeter that will show a negative if reversed Cheap maplins £20 will do or less even on fleabay. By the time you've plugged that in it may be too late
Always carry one also carry this
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Silverline-341082-16A-13A-Converter-socket/dp/B003IJAKLE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1420486179&sr=8-1&keywords=16+amp+to+13+amp so that I can test the lead from the post and the post if necessary make simple job that the wife can do if necessary just by plugging the tester into the fly lead - does not have to go near the RV wiring to check the post and lead out . I have seen qualified sparks use these as a quick safety check on power leads on site
 

Uncle Tony

Subscriber
Is this for when travelling abroad? Does it just plug in to the outlet?
Sorry, I was generalising. These little Ring Main Testers are a very cheap but highly effective unit for a quick initial test of a 13Amp socket to give a guide as to the safety of that socket and by reasoned extrapolation the rest of the circuit feeding that socket. They will only fit into a 13Amp socket, so if you want to get some idea of the safety of a site post in UK, you need a short adapter lead which has the blue plug for the post at one end and a single non-switched 13Amp socket at the other end into which you insert the RMT. (Martindale are only one of the manufacturers)

The three bright neons light up in combinations to show the common wiring faults, so I suppose that they would also light up at a lower voltage, i.e. 120Volt, or glow extra bright if the voltage was high, but should never be used to determine voltage.
 

Daybreaker

Subscriber
I get wifey to lick her fingers and plug her in, if hair goes curly it ok. If it stays straight then I stand her in bucket of water. That sorts it!
 

Uncle Tony

Subscriber
I'm a little concerned about this talk of testing voltage with a multimeter. I'm OK if the operator is skilled and careful, but not if the operator has never used one before and is trying the read the instructions whilst juggling leads with sharp probes. First there is the need to defeat the shutters in the sockets and then the need to guarantee the probe leads do not subsequently become disconnected from the sockets in the tester at which point you have unguarded live pins. Also there is the need to thoroughly understand which colour lead should be connected to which pin to determine reverse polarity.
 

dippingatoe

Well-Known Member

paul&debra

Subscriber
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